AquaCold Cold Therapy Device

Safe and Comfortable Cold Therapy 

Cold temperatures slow down the rate of cellular metabolism allowing for the survival of damaged cells.  These cells would have otherwise died due to the high metabolic activity of the neighbouring healthy cells

Cold temperature reduces the extent of tissue damage, allowing the affected tissues, ligaments, joints, and muscles to heal

The cold penetrates deeply through the tissues and into the joints causing a numbing of the nerve endings and reduced transmission of pain sensation from the injury site to the brain

RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) therapy is a very effective way to manage muscle, ligament and joint injury

Traditional ice packs are inconvenient and are not conducive to adherent cold therapy

- Need to be kept frozen until use

- Don’t stay cold for long periods of time

- Don’t provide a consistent temperature

- Uncomfortable

Item No.         Description   

CTS-001
CUSE
CSSE
CSKE
CSAE

AquaCold Therapy Device 
Universal cold pad
Shoulder cold pad
Knee cold pad
Ankle or foot cold pad

  • Indicated for use after surgery or injury to reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Soft and breathable fabric body contouring pads target cold to the exact area needed.

  • Large capacity, 6 liter tank allows for longer usage time.

  • Adjustable flow rate provides soothing continuous cold therapy.

  • Large, easy to read LCD display offers safe monitoring of prescribed treatment time and temperature.

  • Increases patient compliance, satisfaction, and treatment efficacy.

  • Drug free pain relief.

  • Ice and water fill indicator.

Therapeutic cold is used to manage tissue injury (Cryotherapy) and to

alleviate pain (Cryoanalgesia)

The preoperative and postoperative use of Continuous Cold Therapy after knee arthroplasty is effective in terms of pain control and functional knee scores without a significant change in surgical blood loss. 1 Continuous Cold Therapy has been shown to decrease blood loss, pain and swelling of the operative knee versus an ice bag or the use of traditional narcotics. 1 Studies have also shown lower pain scores vs. epidural analgesia, Robert Jones bandage, narcotic administration, and crushed ice. Overall, most studies noted no difference in range of motion of the operative knee, a decrease in swelling, and a decrease in blood loss with the cold compression. 2

 

 

1 Is cold therapy really efficient after knee arthroplasty?  Ersin Kuyucu et al. Annals of Medicine and Surgery.  2015 Dec; 4(4): 475–478.

2 The Use of Cryotherapy After a Total Knee Replacement: A Literature Review.  S.E. Markert. Orthopaedic Nursing: January/February 2011 - Volume 30 - Issue 1 - p 29–36

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